In-country and Global Monitoring of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325

Women Count – Security Council Resolution 1325: Civil Society Monitoring Report – 2012

In 2012, the Women Count report has sharpened the country specific analysis and recommendations with a focus on emerging trends in each of the participating countries. This is mainly to enable GNWP members and other partners to use their findings as advocacy tools in pushing for the implementation of the recommendations within their respective countries. GNWP also intends to come up with policy briefs for each country, highlighting the women, peace and security profile; main findings and specific recommendations in a reader-friendly format to be used as an advocacy tool both at the local and global levels. In addition to this, the report will have a directory of women, peace and security actors in each country which is one of the gaps often encountered in the women, peace and security environment.

Furthermore, the indicators have been refined in accordance with their thematic clusters to analyze the results and regressions thereof. The previous 16 indicators have been merged into 11 under the Participation, Prevention and Protection, and Promotion pillars. In addition to developing a guideline on the use of these indicators, GNWP also undertook a capacity building training for some of its members on developing monitoring tools as well as advocacy strategies in their reporting processes in Sierra Leone and South Sudan (June 2012).

In 2012, Afghanistan, Burundi, Colombia, The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Fiji, Liberia, Nepal, Netherlands, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Spain, Sri Lanka, South Sudan, Sweden and Uganda took part in the monitoring project. A global snapshot of the findings as well as the individual country reports were published in the book Women Count 2012 – Security Council Resolution 1325: Civil Society Monitoring Report. The report was launched at the Canadian Mission to the United Nations in New York on November 6, 2012, during the 12th anniversary of UNSCR 1325.

Global Report
 
Afghanistan
Burundi
Colombia
Democratic Rebublic of Congo
Fiji
Liberia
Nepal
Netherlands
Philippines
Rwanda
Sierra Leone
South Sudan
Spain
Sri Lanka
Sweden
Uganda


Women Count – Security Council Resolution 1325: Civil Society Monitoring Report – 2011

The second phase of this project included 12 countries, namely Afghanistan, Burundi, Canada, Colombia, Democratic Rebublic of Congo, Liberia, Nepal, the Netherlands, the Philippines, Spain, Sweden and Uganda.  In 2011 in-country indicators workshops were held in Burundi, Colombia, Democratic Rebublic of Congo and Nepal. The global monitoring report comprises a synthesis of the data analysis from the twelve ICAN-GNWP in-country reports and presents seven general findings with corresponding recommendations. The resulting publication Women Count – Security Council Resolution 1325: Civil Society Monitoring Report was launched at the Canadian Mission to the United Nations in New York on October 27, 2011.

Global Report
 
Afghanistan
Burundi
Canada
Colombia
Democratic Rebublic of Congo
Liberia
Nepal
Netherlands
Philippines
Spain
Sweden
Uganda


Women Count – Security Council Resolution 1325: Civil Society Monitoring Report – 2010

GNWP members from Afghanistan, Burundi, Canada, Democratic Republic of Congo, Fiji, Nepal, Netherlands, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone and Uganda participated in the first phase of the in-country and global monitoring of UNSCR 1325, which took place February-September 2010. The resulting publication Women Count – Security Council Resolution 1325: Civil Society Monitoring Report was launched at the Canadian Mission to the United Nations in New York on October 25, 2010.

 
 

Global Report
(Spanish version)
 
Burundi
Democratic Rebublic of Congo
Rwanda
Sierra Leone
Uganda
Afghanistan
Fiji
Nepal
Philippines
Canada
Netherlands


Background

Over the past years there have been a number of developments in international laws that address women and peace and security issues. With the five UN Security Council Resolutions on women, peace and security (1325, 1820, 1888, 1889 and 1960) the Security Council has established a normative framework that guides approach and provides guidance and precedent for broader UN Member State action on women and peace and security issues. The resolutions, together with other laws and policies represent a paradigm shift in how the UN as well as regional bodies and security institutions approach the issue of peace and security from a gender perspective. However, the implementation of the above-mentioned legal instruments and policies has been slow. More than eleven years after the adoption of SCR 1325, a meager 38 of 193 Member States have adopted National Action Plans (NAPs) and the resolution is still unknown in many conflict-affected areas. The subsequent resolutions are hardly known outside of the UN and the international development circle.

The 10th anniversary of UNSCR 1325 in October 2010 presented a critical opportunity to review and reflect on achievements as well as persistent gaps in implementation of the resolution. More importantly, it was an occasion to demand greater accountability and propose timely and relevant actions that Member States, the UN, civil society and other stakeholders should take to fully implement UNSCR 1325. Through its in-country and global monitoring 1325 project, initiated during the lead-up to the 10th anniversary, GNWP contributes to the call for greater accountability by all actors, particularly national governments. The project aims to build the capacity of women’s organizations in monitoring policy implementation; develop/identify indicators and benchmarks for monitoring progress and results of 1325 implementation; and conduct in-country monitoring from the perspectives of women’s groups and civil society.

The monitoring project benefited from the MIT/ICAN study What the Women Say: Participation and UNSCR 1325, which was also launched during the 10th Anniversary of 1325 in NY.  Additionally, it built on the work of the UN Technical Working Group on Indicators and utilized already existing indicators when relevant. GNWP also recognizes the necessity of examining how adequate resources for implementation and monitoring of progress and results can be ensured. It has collaborated with Cordaid in commissioning a study on costing and financing UNSCR 1325.

GNWP plans to continue this project, which is currently in its third year, until 2015. Since 2010, the list of countries which have participated in the reporting include Afghanistan, Burundi, Canada, Colombia, The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Fiji, Liberia, Nepal, Netherlands, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Spain, Sri Lanka, South Sudan, Sweden and Uganda. Furthermore, based on the findings and challenges raised in the reports, the project will continue to refine indicators as necessary; document best practices; cover positive trends and regressions; and uncover the effects of recent political developments at the national, regional and global levels.

“I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to work with GNWP’s partners in Liberia on their 1325 Monitoring Report, in 2011. The social science research methods training that they do is truly innovative and empowering at the grassroots level. My time with them has inspired me to continue building on my own experience in this field.” – Victoria Webbe

“Working together to develop indicators and to determine which ones were non-negotiable and why was a very rich process. I will be able to use the indicators, and customize them with partners in Uganda to monitor 1325.” – Robinah Rubimbwa, CEWIGO; Uganda

I appreciated the process of selecting common indicators and hearing various perspectives. Aside from the workshop broadening my perspective, I will be able to use the technology I learned here when I go back to my own country. I welcome the in-country monitoring project as it will serve as practicum on how we will monitor our own NAP.” – Jasmin Galace, Center for Peace Education; the Philippines

Consultants for this project: Karen Barnes Robinson, Annalise Moser and Antonia Potter

Monitoring plan example UNSCR 1325 Monitoring Tool Uganda

GNWP thanks Cordaid, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade – Canada, ICCO, the Government of Liechtenstein, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Norway, Oxfam Novib, UNFPA and UN Women for their generous support to this project.